The Art of the Sell — The Ideal Muppets

These posts celebrate the movie trailers, movie posters, commercials, print ads, and other promotional material that stand as their own works of art.

In 1966, three years before Sesame Street and a full decade before The Muppet Show, the first licensed toys of Jim Henson’s creations were released. Ideal Toys, makers of Captain Action dolls and board games requiring intricate assembly of plastic parts, snagged the rights to make toy versions of Rowlf and Kermit. Because Henson, his cohorts and their floppy, felt friends largely earned their living by producing commercials, especially early on, it of course made sense for them to put together an advertisement for the new take-home dog and frog. The pitch is fantastic, infusing with the anarchic spirit that was always part of the Muppets’ collective DNA but was especially strong before they were welcomed into the Children’s Television Workshop. If you’ve been longing to see Kermit the Frog threaten bodily harm on anyone who doesn’t engage in capitalism to his satisfaction, well, friend, your wait is finally over.

These posts celebrate the movie trailers, movie posters, commercials, print ads, and other promotional material that stand as their own works of art.

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